Forensic Anthropology - Skeletal analysis

  • Course provided by Udemy
  • Study type: Online
  • Starts: Anytime
  • Price: See latest price on Udemy
Udemy

Course Description

This course will focus on the field of forensic anthropology. It will define the field as a branch of anthropology. It will then focus on the techniques used by forensic anthropologists to analyze human skeletal remains including the estimation of sex, age at death, stature, and the identification of any traumatic lesions present. It will further discuss the role of the forensic anthropologist as part of the medicolegal system. People who are interested in pursuing a career in forensic science, biology, forensic medicine, medicine, osteology, human anatomy, bioarchaeology, or archaeology can all benefit from this course. The course includes powerpoint presentations with extensive explanations of the materials contained in each, exercises to assist the student in gaining proficiency in osteological analysis, and quizzes to test your knowledge. The course includes 14 lectures, 5 exercises, and 3 quizzes to help the student build knowledge of the subject and test their competency. The course is taught from the perspective that the student has little or no prior knowledge, and no equipment is necessary. A good anatomy book will assist the student, but numerous online resources are available for students to consult. If you have an interest in learning about just how much you can really tell from that skeleton in your closet, this course is for you!

Who this course is for:

  • This course is best suited for students with a strong interest in science, human anatomy, and/or forensic science. Students who are exploring possible careers in any of the above fields would benefit from this course. Students who have an interest in a medicolegal profession would benefit from this course. Students who have an interest in a profession in law enforcement would benefit from this course. Students who are uncomfortable with viewing human remains should not take this course.
  • None

Course content

14 sections • 37 lectures • 38m total length

Instructor

Bioarchaeologist and Forensic Anthropologist
  • 4.5 Instructor Rating
  • 147 Reviews
  • 918 Students
  • 1 Course

Hi, I want to tell you a little bit about myself. My name is Catherine Gaither (you can call me Cathy), and I am an instructor with Udemy.

Like many of you, my educational and professional career path was a non-traditional one. After high school, I didn’t really know what I wanted to do. I had been accepted into the Kansas City Art Institute, which at that time was a very prestigious art school, but I knew that making a living as a fine artist was difficult and I would probably hav

Expected Outcomes

  1. Describe the scope of the field of anthropology; Describe the scope of the field of forensic anthropology; Identify the major bones of the human skeleton; Distinguish human bones from animal bones; Estimate sex of the individual from skeletal elements; Estimate the age at death of the individual from skeletal elements; Estimate the height and weight of the individual at death; Calculate the minimum number of individuals in a skeletal assemblage; Estimate ancestry from skeletal remains; Identify and define traumatic lesions on human skeletal remains; Understand how to produce a professional report on the results of the analysis; Understand the ethical considerations of importance to physical anthropologists and forensic anthropologists. Show more Show less Requirements The course is taught from the perspective that the student has no prior knowledge of the field; however, students would benefit from a background in basic biology and scientific principles. Description This course will focus on the field of forensic anthropology. It will define the field as a branch of anthropology. It will then focus on the techniques used by forensic anthropologists to analyze human skeletal remains including the estimation of sex, age at death, stature, and the identification of any traumatic lesions present. It will further discuss the role of the forensic anthropologist as part of the medicolegal system. People who are interested in pursuing a career in forensic science, biology, forensic medicine, medicine, osteology, human anatomy, bioarchaeology, or archaeology can all benefit from this course. The course includes powerpoint presentations with extensive explanations of the materials contained in each, exercises to assist the student in gaining proficiency in osteological analysis, and quizzes to test your knowledge. The course includes 14 lectures, 5 exercises, and 3 quizzes to help the student build knowledge of the subject and test their competency. The course is taught from the perspective that the student has little or no prior knowledge, and no equipment is necessary. A good anatomy book will assist the student, but numerous online resources are available for students to consult. If you have an interest in learning about just how much you can really tell from that skeleton in your closet, this course is for you! Who this course is for: This course is best suited for students with a strong interest in science, human anatomy, and/or forensic science. Students who are exploring possible careers in any of the above fields would benefit from this course. Students who have an interest in a medicolegal profession would benefit from this course. Students who have an interest in a profession in law enforcement would benefit from this course. Students who are uncomfortable with viewing human remains should not take this course. None Show more Show less Course content 14 sections • 37 lectures • 38m total length Expand all sections Course outline 1 lecture • 5min Course outline Preview 04:59 The field of Anthropology 2 lectures • 1min What is Anthropology? 00:16 Introduction to Anthropology 00:04 Forensic Anthropology 2 lectures • 1min Forensic Anthropology 00:25 Forensic Anthropology 00:05 Human Osteology 2 lectures • 2min Human Osteology 00:09 Supplemental bone identification video lecture 01:56 Comparative Osteology 2 lectures • 4min Comparative Osteology 00:07 Supplemental comparative osteology video lecture 03:35 Estimation of sex from skeletal remains 2 lectures • 5min Estimating sex from skeletal elements Preview 04:50 Estimating sex from human remains powerpoint 00:05 Estimating age at death from skeletal remains 4 lectures • 6min Estimating age at death from skeletal remains 00:49 Estimate age at death powerpoint 00:04 Supplemental age estimation video lecture 03:47 Supplemental age estimation video lecture number 2 Preview 01:40 Estimating age and sex in the skeleton 5 questions Estimating stature, BMI, and MNI 2 lectures • 1min Estimating Stature, BMI, and MNI 00:39 Estimating stature, BMI, and MNI powerpoint 00:04 Estimating ancestral affiliation 3 lectures • 6min Estimating ancestry 02:01 Estimating ancestry powerpoint 00:04 Supplemental ancestry estimation video lecture 03:46 Estimating ancestry, stature, BMI, and MNI 5 questions Analyzing bones for trauma 5 lectures • 5min Analyzing trauma 00:22 How does trauma present on the skeleton; Projectile trauma 00:07 Sharp force trauma 00:04 Blunt force trauma 00:04 Supplemental trauma analysis video lecture 04:34 Trauma quiz 5 questions 4 more sections Instructor Catherine Gaither Bioarchaeologist and Forensic Anthropologist 4.5 Instructor Rating 147 Reviews 918 Students 1 Course Hi, I want to tell you a little bit about myself. My name is Catherine Gaither (you can call me Cathy), and I am an instructor with Udemy. Like many of you, my educational and professional career path was a non-traditional one. After high school, I didn’t really know what I wanted to do. I had been accepted into the Kansas City Art Institute, which at that time was a very prestigious art school, but I knew that making a living as a fine artist was difficult and I would probably have to work in commercial art. I didn’t really want to do that. So, I got a job, but soon found out that I just couldn’t ‘work for the vacations’. I needed to love my job. I thought long and hard about what I might do and decided that I would go to school for something where I could end up working with animals. I love animals. I ended up going to the Bel-Rea Institute for Animal Health Technology. I earned an Associate’s Degree, and proceeded to work with veterinarians for the next 11 years. In 1990, I took a trip to Borneo to work with a world renowned primatologist, Birute Galdikas, studying orangutans in the jungle. While I loved the animals, I was even more fascinated by the people, and it was then that I decided I wanted to go back to school for anthropology. Initially, I thought I would do cultural anthropology, but as my education progressed, I was introduced to archaeology and I just loved it. It was like being a detective, but the “crime” happened 1000 years ago or 2000 years ago or 200 years ago. I thought to myself, “I will never get bored in this field.” So, while working one and sometimes two jobs, I went back to school eventually earning my Bachelor’s Degree in anthropology. But what kind of archaeology did I want to do? Well, I didn’t know, so I took two years off after graduating and went to work in Florida on shipwreck sites as a contract archaeologist. I was already a certified open water diver and I thought I could combine two things that I really loved. While doing that, I had a chance to analyze some animal bones from a shipwreck. The animals, you see, get trapped below decks when a ship is going down. The people usually come to the top deck and are washed overboard or jump overboard, but the animals are stuck. Well, when I analyzed these bones, I was hooked on bones! It was so fascinating to me that you could tell so much from skeletal remains. After looking into what you could with human skeletal remains, I knew what I wanted to do. I contacted my undergraduate advisor to ask him what to do, and he told me that I had to come work in Peru. There are lots of human skeletons from archaeological contexts there. He helped me to analyze some skeletons and gave me advice on where to go to school. I ended up taking his advice and going to Tulane University where I worked with John Verano, a very well-known and highly regarded paleopathologist who has and continues to work in Peru. I eventually earned both a Master’s Degree and my PhD from Tulane University. Now I am a paleopathologist/bioarchaeologist and forensic anthropologist. I have worked for many years in academia, but at the beginning of 2015, I decided to go to work as a forensic consultant. I now travel extensively working as a consultant. After these experiences, I would tell you that you should follow your dreams, and that if you want something, go after it. Don’t ever think you are too old or too poor or too whatever. If you want something and you dedicate yourself to getting it, you can achieve your goals. I hope to help you with that effort in some small way. So, welcome to class and I look forward to working with you. Show more Show less Udemy Business Teach on Udemy Get the app About us Contact us Careers Blog Help and Support Affiliate Impressum Kontakt Terms Privacy policy Cookie settings Sitemap © 2021 Udemy, Inc. window.handleCSSToggleButtonClick = function (event) { var target = event.currentTarget; var cssToggleId = target && target.dataset && target.dataset.cssToggleId; var input = cssToggleId && document.getElementById(cssToggleId); if (input) { if (input.dataset.type === 'checkbox') { input.dataset.checked = input.dataset.checked ? '' : 'checked'; } else { input.dataset.checked = input.dataset.allowToggle && input.dataset.checked ? '' : 'checked'; var radios = document.querySelectorAll('[name="' + input.dataset.name + '"]'); for (var i = 0; i (function(){window['__CF$cv$params']={r:'67886727bf4e5464',m:'f342afc7dcb9e70e199e4bfe5e275ec9529c902d-1627918809-1800-ARCGAGJHfWJarFu01+IXW3j2DfJkPRuRs7LeVeeXMOdaBH/eITe6rM3taarMItiHUgYSVRgNPWYSv33ULpaOgtQkQQuB7UKDa8uxvmTNbNllTIKhexwzeWkamTT+TP17ZByap9yied+AwAByi07/CaYPglICndeSPHq88QdofIHOfmdLUSGYUZNXSr/7MgxG4w==',s:[0x582110051a,0xbad29ddf31],}})();
  2. Describe the scope of the field of forensic anthropology; Identify the major bones of the human skeleton; Distinguish human bones from animal bones; Estimate sex of the individual from skeletal elements; Estimate the age at death of the individual from skeletal elements; Estimate the height and weight of the individual at death; Calculate the minimum number of individuals in a skeletal assemblage; Estimate ancestry from skeletal remains; Identify and define traumatic lesions on human skeletal remains; Understand how to produce a professional report on the results of the analysis; Understand the ethical considerations of importance to physical anthropologists and forensic anthropologists. Show more Show less Requirements The course is taught from the perspective that the student has no prior knowledge of the field; however, students would benefit from a background in basic biology and scientific principles. Description This course will focus on the field of forensic anthropology. It will define the field as a branch of anthropology. It will then focus on the techniques used by forensic anthropologists to analyze human skeletal remains including the estimation of sex, age at death, stature, and the identification of any traumatic lesions present. It will further discuss the role of the forensic anthropologist as part of the medicolegal system. People who are interested in pursuing a career in forensic science, biology, forensic medicine, medicine, osteology, human anatomy, bioarchaeology, or archaeology can all benefit from this course. The course includes powerpoint presentations with extensive explanations of the materials contained in each, exercises to assist the student in gaining proficiency in osteological analysis, and quizzes to test your knowledge. The course includes 14 lectures, 5 exercises, and 3 quizzes to help the student build knowledge of the subject and test their competency. The course is taught from the perspective that the student has little or no prior knowledge, and no equipment is necessary. A good anatomy book will assist the student, but numerous online resources are available for students to consult. If you have an interest in learning about just how much you can really tell from that skeleton in your closet, this course is for you! Who this course is for: This course is best suited for students with a strong interest in science, human anatomy, and/or forensic science. Students who are exploring possible careers in any of the above fields would benefit from this course. Students who have an interest in a medicolegal profession would benefit from this course. Students who have an interest in a profession in law enforcement would benefit from this course. Students who are uncomfortable with viewing human remains should not take this course. None Show more Show less Course content 14 sections • 37 lectures • 38m total length Expand all sections Course outline 1 lecture • 5min Course outline Preview 04:59 The field of Anthropology 2 lectures • 1min What is Anthropology? 00:16 Introduction to Anthropology 00:04 Forensic Anthropology 2 lectures • 1min Forensic Anthropology 00:25 Forensic Anthropology 00:05 Human Osteology 2 lectures • 2min Human Osteology 00:09 Supplemental bone identification video lecture 01:56 Comparative Osteology 2 lectures • 4min Comparative Osteology 00:07 Supplemental comparative osteology video lecture 03:35 Estimation of sex from skeletal remains 2 lectures • 5min Estimating sex from skeletal elements Preview 04:50 Estimating sex from human remains powerpoint 00:05 Estimating age at death from skeletal remains 4 lectures • 6min Estimating age at death from skeletal remains 00:49 Estimate age at death powerpoint 00:04 Supplemental age estimation video lecture 03:47 Supplemental age estimation video lecture number 2 Preview 01:40 Estimating age and sex in the skeleton 5 questions Estimating stature, BMI, and MNI 2 lectures • 1min Estimating Stature, BMI, and MNI 00:39 Estimating stature, BMI, and MNI powerpoint 00:04 Estimating ancestral affiliation 3 lectures • 6min Estimating ancestry 02:01 Estimating ancestry powerpoint 00:04 Supplemental ancestry estimation video lecture 03:46 Estimating ancestry, stature, BMI, and MNI 5 questions Analyzing bones for trauma 5 lectures • 5min Analyzing trauma 00:22 How does trauma present on the skeleton; Projectile trauma 00:07 Sharp force trauma 00:04 Blunt force trauma 00:04 Supplemental trauma analysis video lecture 04:34 Trauma quiz 5 questions 4 more sections Instructor Catherine Gaither Bioarchaeologist and Forensic Anthropologist 4.5 Instructor Rating 147 Reviews 918 Students 1 Course Hi, I want to tell you a little bit about myself. My name is Catherine Gaither (you can call me Cathy), and I am an instructor with Udemy. Like many of you, my educational and professional career path was a non-traditional one. After high school, I didn’t really know what I wanted to do. I had been accepted into the Kansas City Art Institute, which at that time was a very prestigious art school, but I knew that making a living as a fine artist was difficult and I would probably have to work in commercial art. I didn’t really want to do that. So, I got a job, but soon found out that I just couldn’t ‘work for the vacations’. I needed to love my job. I thought long and hard about what I might do and decided that I would go to school for something where I could end up working with animals. I love animals. I ended up going to the Bel-Rea Institute for Animal Health Technology. I earned an Associate’s Degree, and proceeded to work with veterinarians for the next 11 years. In 1990, I took a trip to Borneo to work with a world renowned primatologist, Birute Galdikas, studying orangutans in the jungle. While I loved the animals, I was even more fascinated by the people, and it was then that I decided I wanted to go back to school for anthropology. Initially, I thought I would do cultural anthropology, but as my education progressed, I was introduced to archaeology and I just loved it. It was like being a detective, but the “crime” happened 1000 years ago or 2000 years ago or 200 years ago. I thought to myself, “I will never get bored in this field.” So, while working one and sometimes two jobs, I went back to school eventually earning my Bachelor’s Degree in anthropology. But what kind of archaeology did I want to do? Well, I didn’t know, so I took two years off after graduating and went to work in Florida on shipwreck sites as a contract archaeologist. I was already a certified open water diver and I thought I could combine two things that I really loved. While doing that, I had a chance to analyze some animal bones from a shipwreck. The animals, you see, get trapped below decks when a ship is going down. The people usually come to the top deck and are washed overboard or jump overboard, but the animals are stuck. Well, when I analyzed these bones, I was hooked on bones! It was so fascinating to me that you could tell so much from skeletal remains. After looking into what you could with human skeletal remains, I knew what I wanted to do. I contacted my undergraduate advisor to ask him what to do, and he told me that I had to come work in Peru. There are lots of human skeletons from archaeological contexts there. He helped me to analyze some skeletons and gave me advice on where to go to school. I ended up taking his advice and going to Tulane University where I worked with John Verano, a very well-known and highly regarded paleopathologist who has and continues to work in Peru. I eventually earned both a Master’s Degree and my PhD from Tulane University. Now I am a paleopathologist/bioarchaeologist and forensic anthropologist. I have worked for many years in academia, but at the beginning of 2015, I decided to go to work as a forensic consultant. I now travel extensively working as a consultant. After these experiences, I would tell you that you should follow your dreams, and that if you want something, go after it. Don’t ever think you are too old or too poor or too whatever. If you want something and you dedicate yourself to getting it, you can achieve your goals. I hope to help you with that effort in some small way. So, welcome to class and I look forward to working with you. Show more Show less Udemy Business Teach on Udemy Get the app About us Contact us Careers Blog Help and Support Affiliate Impressum Kontakt Terms Privacy policy Cookie settings Sitemap © 2021 Udemy, Inc. window.handleCSSToggleButtonClick = function (event) { var target = event.currentTarget; var cssToggleId = target && target.dataset && target.dataset.cssToggleId; var input = cssToggleId && document.getElementById(cssToggleId); if (input) { if (input.dataset.type === 'checkbox') { input.dataset.checked = input.dataset.checked ? '' : 'checked'; } else { input.dataset.checked = input.dataset.allowToggle && input.dataset.checked ? '' : 'checked'; var radios = document.querySelectorAll('[name="' + input.dataset.name + '"]'); for (var i = 0; i (function(){window['__CF$cv$params']={r:'67886727bf4e5464',m:'f342afc7dcb9e70e199e4bfe5e275ec9529c902d-1627918809-1800-ARCGAGJHfWJarFu01+IXW3j2DfJkPRuRs7LeVeeXMOdaBH/eITe6rM3taarMItiHUgYSVRgNPWYSv33ULpaOgtQkQQuB7UKDa8uxvmTNbNllTIKhexwzeWkamTT+TP17ZByap9yied+AwAByi07/CaYPglICndeSPHq88QdofIHOfmdLUSGYUZNXSr/7MgxG4w==',s:[0x582110051a,0xbad29ddf31],}})();
  3. Identify the major bones of the human skeleton; Distinguish human bones from animal bones; Estimate sex of the individual from skeletal elements; Estimate the age at death of the individual from skeletal elements; Estimate the height and weight of the individual at death; Calculate the minimum number of individuals in a skeletal assemblage; Estimate ancestry from skeletal remains; Identify and define traumatic lesions on human skeletal remains; Understand how to produce a professional report on the results of the analysis; Understand the ethical considerations of importance to physical anthropologists and forensic anthropologists. Show more Show less Requirements The course is taught from the perspective that the student has no prior knowledge of the field; however, students would benefit from a background in basic biology and scientific principles. Description This course will focus on the field of forensic anthropology. It will define the field as a branch of anthropology. It will then focus on the techniques used by forensic anthropologists to analyze human skeletal remains including the estimation of sex, age at death, stature, and the identification of any traumatic lesions present. It will further discuss the role of the forensic anthropologist as part of the medicolegal system. People who are interested in pursuing a career in forensic science, biology, forensic medicine, medicine, osteology, human anatomy, bioarchaeology, or archaeology can all benefit from this course. The course includes powerpoint presentations with extensive explanations of the materials contained in each, exercises to assist the student in gaining proficiency in osteological analysis, and quizzes to test your knowledge. The course includes 14 lectures, 5 exercises, and 3 quizzes to help the student build knowledge of the subject and test their competency. The course is taught from the perspective that the student has little or no prior knowledge, and no equipment is necessary. A good anatomy book will assist the student, but numerous online resources are available for students to consult. If you have an interest in learning about just how much you can really tell from that skeleton in your closet, this course is for you! Who this course is for: This course is best suited for students with a strong interest in science, human anatomy, and/or forensic science. Students who are exploring possible careers in any of the above fields would benefit from this course. Students who have an interest in a medicolegal profession would benefit from this course. Students who have an interest in a profession in law enforcement would benefit from this course. Students who are uncomfortable with viewing human remains should not take this course. None Show more Show less Course content 14 sections • 37 lectures • 38m total length Expand all sections Course outline 1 lecture • 5min Course outline Preview 04:59 The field of Anthropology 2 lectures • 1min What is Anthropology? 00:16 Introduction to Anthropology 00:04 Forensic Anthropology 2 lectures • 1min Forensic Anthropology 00:25 Forensic Anthropology 00:05 Human Osteology 2 lectures • 2min Human Osteology 00:09 Supplemental bone identification video lecture 01:56 Comparative Osteology 2 lectures • 4min Comparative Osteology 00:07 Supplemental comparative osteology video lecture 03:35 Estimation of sex from skeletal remains 2 lectures • 5min Estimating sex from skeletal elements Preview 04:50 Estimating sex from human remains powerpoint 00:05 Estimating age at death from skeletal remains 4 lectures • 6min Estimating age at death from skeletal remains 00:49 Estimate age at death powerpoint 00:04 Supplemental age estimation video lecture 03:47 Supplemental age estimation video lecture number 2 Preview 01:40 Estimating age and sex in the skeleton 5 questions Estimating stature, BMI, and MNI 2 lectures • 1min Estimating Stature, BMI, and MNI 00:39 Estimating stature, BMI, and MNI powerpoint 00:04 Estimating ancestral affiliation 3 lectures • 6min Estimating ancestry 02:01 Estimating ancestry powerpoint 00:04 Supplemental ancestry estimation video lecture 03:46 Estimating ancestry, stature, BMI, and MNI 5 questions Analyzing bones for trauma 5 lectures • 5min Analyzing trauma 00:22 How does trauma present on the skeleton; Projectile trauma 00:07 Sharp force trauma 00:04 Blunt force trauma 00:04 Supplemental trauma analysis video lecture 04:34 Trauma quiz 5 questions 4 more sections Instructor Catherine Gaither Bioarchaeologist and Forensic Anthropologist 4.5 Instructor Rating 147 Reviews 918 Students 1 Course Hi, I want to tell you a little bit about myself. My name is Catherine Gaither (you can call me Cathy), and I am an instructor with Udemy. Like many of you, my educational and professional career path was a non-traditional one. After high school, I didn’t really know what I wanted to do. I had been accepted into the Kansas City Art Institute, which at that time was a very prestigious art school, but I knew that making a living as a fine artist was difficult and I would probably have to work in commercial art. I didn’t really want to do that. So, I got a job, but soon found out that I just couldn’t ‘work for the vacations’. I needed to love my job. I thought long and hard about what I might do and decided that I would go to school for something where I could end up working with animals. I love animals. I ended up going to the Bel-Rea Institute for Animal Health Technology. I earned an Associate’s Degree, and proceeded to work with veterinarians for the next 11 years. In 1990, I took a trip to Borneo to work with a world renowned primatologist, Birute Galdikas, studying orangutans in the jungle. While I loved the animals, I was even more fascinated by the people, and it was then that I decided I wanted to go back to school for anthropology. Initially, I thought I would do cultural anthropology, but as my education progressed, I was introduced to archaeology and I just loved it. It was like being a detective, but the “crime” happened 1000 years ago or 2000 years ago or 200 years ago. I thought to myself, “I will never get bored in this field.” So, while working one and sometimes two jobs, I went back to school eventually earning my Bachelor’s Degree in anthropology. But what kind of archaeology did I want to do? Well, I didn’t know, so I took two years off after graduating and went to work in Florida on shipwreck sites as a contract archaeologist. I was already a certified open water diver and I thought I could combine two things that I really loved. While doing that, I had a chance to analyze some animal bones from a shipwreck. The animals, you see, get trapped below decks when a ship is going down. The people usually come to the top deck and are washed overboard or jump overboard, but the animals are stuck. Well, when I analyzed these bones, I was hooked on bones! It was so fascinating to me that you could tell so much from skeletal remains. After looking into what you could with human skeletal remains, I knew what I wanted to do. I contacted my undergraduate advisor to ask him what to do, and he told me that I had to come work in Peru. There are lots of human skeletons from archaeological contexts there. He helped me to analyze some skeletons and gave me advice on where to go to school. I ended up taking his advice and going to Tulane University where I worked with John Verano, a very well-known and highly regarded paleopathologist who has and continues to work in Peru. I eventually earned both a Master’s Degree and my PhD from Tulane University. Now I am a paleopathologist/bioarchaeologist and forensic anthropologist. I have worked for many years in academia, but at the beginning of 2015, I decided to go to work as a forensic consultant. I now travel extensively working as a consultant. After these experiences, I would tell you that you should follow your dreams, and that if you want something, go after it. Don’t ever think you are too old or too poor or too whatever. If you want something and you dedicate yourself to getting it, you can achieve your goals. I hope to help you with that effort in some small way. So, welcome to class and I look forward to working with you. Show more Show less Udemy Business Teach on Udemy Get the app About us Contact us Careers Blog Help and Support Affiliate Impressum Kontakt Terms Privacy policy Cookie settings Sitemap © 2021 Udemy, Inc. window.handleCSSToggleButtonClick = function (event) { var target = event.currentTarget; var cssToggleId = target && target.dataset && target.dataset.cssToggleId; var input = cssToggleId && document.getElementById(cssToggleId); if (input) { if (input.dataset.type === 'checkbox') { input.dataset.checked = input.dataset.checked ? '' : 'checked'; } else { input.dataset.checked = input.dataset.allowToggle && input.dataset.checked ? '' : 'checked'; var radios = document.querySelectorAll('[name="' + input.dataset.name + '"]'); for (var i = 0; i (function(){window['__CF$cv$params']={r:'67886727bf4e5464',m:'f342afc7dcb9e70e199e4bfe5e275ec9529c902d-1627918809-1800-ARCGAGJHfWJarFu01+IXW3j2DfJkPRuRs7LeVeeXMOdaBH/eITe6rM3taarMItiHUgYSVRgNPWYSv33ULpaOgtQkQQuB7UKDa8uxvmTNbNllTIKhexwzeWkamTT+TP17ZByap9yied+AwAByi07/CaYPglICndeSPHq88QdofIHOfmdLUSGYUZNXSr/7MgxG4w==',s:[0x582110051a,0xbad29ddf31],}})();
  4. Distinguish human bones from animal bones; Estimate sex of the individual from skeletal elements; Estimate the age at death of the individual from skeletal elements; Estimate the height and weight of the individual at death; Calculate the minimum number of individuals in a skeletal assemblage; Estimate ancestry from skeletal remains; Identify and define traumatic lesions on human skeletal remains; Understand how to produce a professional report on the results of the analysis; Understand the ethical considerations of importance to physical anthropologists and forensic anthropologists. Show more Show less Requirements The course is taught from the perspective that the student has no prior knowledge of the field; however, students would benefit from a background in basic biology and scientific principles. Description This course will focus on the field of forensic anthropology. It will define the field as a branch of anthropology. It will then focus on the techniques used by forensic anthropologists to analyze human skeletal remains including the estimation of sex, age at death, stature, and the identification of any traumatic lesions present. It will further discuss the role of the forensic anthropologist as part of the medicolegal system. People who are interested in pursuing a career in forensic science, biology, forensic medicine, medicine, osteology, human anatomy, bioarchaeology, or archaeology can all benefit from this course. The course includes powerpoint presentations with extensive explanations of the materials contained in each, exercises to assist the student in gaining proficiency in osteological analysis, and quizzes to test your knowledge. The course includes 14 lectures, 5 exercises, and 3 quizzes to help the student build knowledge of the subject and test their competency. The course is taught from the perspective that the student has little or no prior knowledge, and no equipment is necessary. A good anatomy book will assist the student, but numerous online resources are available for students to consult. If you have an interest in learning about just how much you can really tell from that skeleton in your closet, this course is for you! Who this course is for: This course is best suited for students with a strong interest in science, human anatomy, and/or forensic science. Students who are exploring possible careers in any of the above fields would benefit from this course. Students who have an interest in a medicolegal profession would benefit from this course. Students who have an interest in a profession in law enforcement would benefit from this course. Students who are uncomfortable with viewing human remains should not take this course. None Show more Show less Course content 14 sections • 37 lectures • 38m total length Expand all sections Course outline 1 lecture • 5min Course outline Preview 04:59 The field of Anthropology 2 lectures • 1min What is Anthropology? 00:16 Introduction to Anthropology 00:04 Forensic Anthropology 2 lectures • 1min Forensic Anthropology 00:25 Forensic Anthropology 00:05 Human Osteology 2 lectures • 2min Human Osteology 00:09 Supplemental bone identification video lecture 01:56 Comparative Osteology 2 lectures • 4min Comparative Osteology 00:07 Supplemental comparative osteology video lecture 03:35 Estimation of sex from skeletal remains 2 lectures • 5min Estimating sex from skeletal elements Preview 04:50 Estimating sex from human remains powerpoint 00:05 Estimating age at death from skeletal remains 4 lectures • 6min Estimating age at death from skeletal remains 00:49 Estimate age at death powerpoint 00:04 Supplemental age estimation video lecture 03:47 Supplemental age estimation video lecture number 2 Preview 01:40 Estimating age and sex in the skeleton 5 questions Estimating stature, BMI, and MNI 2 lectures • 1min Estimating Stature, BMI, and MNI 00:39 Estimating stature, BMI, and MNI powerpoint 00:04 Estimating ancestral affiliation 3 lectures • 6min Estimating ancestry 02:01 Estimating ancestry powerpoint 00:04 Supplemental ancestry estimation video lecture 03:46 Estimating ancestry, stature, BMI, and MNI 5 questions Analyzing bones for trauma 5 lectures • 5min Analyzing trauma 00:22 How does trauma present on the skeleton; Projectile trauma 00:07 Sharp force trauma 00:04 Blunt force trauma 00:04 Supplemental trauma analysis video lecture 04:34 Trauma quiz 5 questions 4 more sections Instructor Catherine Gaither Bioarchaeologist and Forensic Anthropologist 4.5 Instructor Rating 147 Reviews 918 Students 1 Course Hi, I want to tell you a little bit about myself. My name is Catherine Gaither (you can call me Cathy), and I am an instructor with Udemy. Like many of you, my educational and professional career path was a non-traditional one. After high school, I didn’t really know what I wanted to do. I had been accepted into the Kansas City Art Institute, which at that time was a very prestigious art school, but I knew that making a living as a fine artist was difficult and I would probably have to work in commercial art. I didn’t really want to do that. So, I got a job, but soon found out that I just couldn’t ‘work for the vacations’. I needed to love my job. I thought long and hard about what I might do and decided that I would go to school for something where I could end up working with animals. I love animals. I ended up going to the Bel-Rea Institute for Animal Health Technology. I earned an Associate’s Degree, and proceeded to work with veterinarians for the next 11 years. In 1990, I took a trip to Borneo to work with a world renowned primatologist, Birute Galdikas, studying orangutans in the jungle. While I loved the animals, I was even more fascinated by the people, and it was then that I decided I wanted to go back to school for anthropology. Initially, I thought I would do cultural anthropology, but as my education progressed, I was introduced to archaeology and I just loved it. It was like being a detective, but the “crime” happened 1000 years ago or 2000 years ago or 200 years ago. I thought to myself, “I will never get bored in this field.” So, while working one and sometimes two jobs, I went back to school eventually earning my Bachelor’s Degree in anthropology. But what kind of archaeology did I want to do? Well, I didn’t know, so I took two years off after graduating and went to work in Florida on shipwreck sites as a contract archaeologist. I was already a certified open water diver and I thought I could combine two things that I really loved. While doing that, I had a chance to analyze some animal bones from a shipwreck. The animals, you see, get trapped below decks when a ship is going down. The people usually come to the top deck and are washed overboard or jump overboard, but the animals are stuck. Well, when I analyzed these bones, I was hooked on bones! It was so fascinating to me that you could tell so much from skeletal remains. After looking into what you could with human skeletal remains, I knew what I wanted to do. I contacted my undergraduate advisor to ask him what to do, and he told me that I had to come work in Peru. There are lots of human skeletons from archaeological contexts there. He helped me to analyze some skeletons and gave me advice on where to go to school. I ended up taking his advice and going to Tulane University where I worked with John Verano, a very well-known and highly regarded paleopathologist who has and continues to work in Peru. I eventually earned both a Master’s Degree and my PhD from Tulane University. Now I am a paleopathologist/bioarchaeologist and forensic anthropologist. I have worked for many years in academia, but at the beginning of 2015, I decided to go to work as a forensic consultant. I now travel extensively working as a consultant. After these experiences, I would tell you that you should follow your dreams, and that if you want something, go after it. Don’t ever think you are too old or too poor or too whatever. If you want something and you dedicate yourself to getting it, you can achieve your goals. I hope to help you with that effort in some small way. So, welcome to class and I look forward to working with you. Show more Show less Udemy Business Teach on Udemy Get the app About us Contact us Careers Blog Help and Support Affiliate Impressum Kontakt Terms Privacy policy Cookie settings Sitemap © 2021 Udemy, Inc. window.handleCSSToggleButtonClick = function (event) { var target = event.currentTarget; var cssToggleId = target && target.dataset && target.dataset.cssToggleId; var input = cssToggleId && document.getElementById(cssToggleId); if (input) { if (input.dataset.type === 'checkbox') { input.dataset.checked = input.dataset.checked ? '' : 'checked'; } else { input.dataset.checked = input.dataset.allowToggle && input.dataset.checked ? '' : 'checked'; var radios = document.querySelectorAll('[name="' + input.dataset.name + '"]'); for (var i = 0; i (function(){window['__CF$cv$params']={r:'67886727bf4e5464',m:'f342afc7dcb9e70e199e4bfe5e275ec9529c902d-1627918809-1800-ARCGAGJHfWJarFu01+IXW3j2DfJkPRuRs7LeVeeXMOdaBH/eITe6rM3taarMItiHUgYSVRgNPWYSv33ULpaOgtQkQQuB7UKDa8uxvmTNbNllTIKhexwzeWkamTT+TP17ZByap9yied+AwAByi07/CaYPglICndeSPHq88QdofIHOfmdLUSGYUZNXSr/7MgxG4w==',s:[0x582110051a,0xbad29ddf31],}})();
  5. Estimate sex of the individual from skeletal elements; Estimate the age at death of the individual from skeletal elements; Estimate the height and weight of the individual at death; Calculate the minimum number of individuals in a skeletal assemblage; Estimate ancestry from skeletal remains; Identify and define traumatic lesions on human skeletal remains; Understand how to produce a professional report on the results of the analysis; Understand the ethical considerations of importance to physical anthropologists and forensic anthropologists. Show more Show less Requirements The course is taught from the perspective that the student has no prior knowledge of the field; however, students would benefit from a background in basic biology and scientific principles. Description This course will focus on the field of forensic anthropology. It will define the field as a branch of anthropology. It will then focus on the techniques used by forensic anthropologists to analyze human skeletal remains including the estimation of sex, age at death, stature, and the identification of any traumatic lesions present. It will further discuss the role of the forensic anthropologist as part of the medicolegal system. People who are interested in pursuing a career in forensic science, biology, forensic medicine, medicine, osteology, human anatomy, bioarchaeology, or archaeology can all benefit from this course. The course includes powerpoint presentations with extensive explanations of the materials contained in each, exercises to assist the student in gaining proficiency in osteological analysis, and quizzes to test your knowledge. The course includes 14 lectures, 5 exercises, and 3 quizzes to help the student build knowledge of the subject and test their competency. The course is taught from the perspective that the student has little or no prior knowledge, and no equipment is necessary. A good anatomy book will assist the student, but numerous online resources are available for students to consult. If you have an interest in learning about just how much you can really tell from that skeleton in your closet, this course is for you! Who this course is for: This course is best suited for students with a strong interest in science, human anatomy, and/or forensic science. Students who are exploring possible careers in any of the above fields would benefit from this course. Students who have an interest in a medicolegal profession would benefit from this course. Students who have an interest in a profession in law enforcement would benefit from this course. Students who are uncomfortable with viewing human remains should not take this course. None Show more Show less Course content 14 sections • 37 lectures • 38m total length Expand all sections Course outline 1 lecture • 5min Course outline Preview 04:59 The field of Anthropology 2 lectures • 1min What is Anthropology? 00:16 Introduction to Anthropology 00:04 Forensic Anthropology 2 lectures • 1min Forensic Anthropology 00:25 Forensic Anthropology 00:05 Human Osteology 2 lectures • 2min Human Osteology 00:09 Supplemental bone identification video lecture 01:56 Comparative Osteology 2 lectures • 4min Comparative Osteology 00:07 Supplemental comparative osteology video lecture 03:35 Estimation of sex from skeletal remains 2 lectures • 5min Estimating sex from skeletal elements Preview 04:50 Estimating sex from human remains powerpoint 00:05 Estimating age at death from skeletal remains 4 lectures • 6min Estimating age at death from skeletal remains 00:49 Estimate age at death powerpoint 00:04 Supplemental age estimation video lecture 03:47 Supplemental age estimation video lecture number 2 Preview 01:40 Estimating age and sex in the skeleton 5 questions Estimating stature, BMI, and MNI 2 lectures • 1min Estimating Stature, BMI, and MNI 00:39 Estimating stature, BMI, and MNI powerpoint 00:04 Estimating ancestral affiliation 3 lectures • 6min Estimating ancestry 02:01 Estimating ancestry powerpoint 00:04 Supplemental ancestry estimation video lecture 03:46 Estimating ancestry, stature, BMI, and MNI 5 questions Analyzing bones for trauma 5 lectures • 5min Analyzing trauma 00:22 How does trauma present on the skeleton; Projectile trauma 00:07 Sharp force trauma 00:04 Blunt force trauma 00:04 Supplemental trauma analysis video lecture 04:34 Trauma quiz 5 questions 4 more sections Instructor Catherine Gaither Bioarchaeologist and Forensic Anthropologist 4.5 Instructor Rating 147 Reviews 918 Students 1 Course Hi, I want to tell you a little bit about myself. My name is Catherine Gaither (you can call me Cathy), and I am an instructor with Udemy. Like many of you, my educational and professional career path was a non-traditional one. After high school, I didn’t really know what I wanted to do. I had been accepted into the Kansas City Art Institute, which at that time was a very prestigious art school, but I knew that making a living as a fine artist was difficult and I would probably have to work in commercial art. I didn’t really want to do that. So, I got a job, but soon found out that I just couldn’t ‘work for the vacations’. I needed to love my job. I thought long and hard about what I might do and decided that I would go to school for something where I could end up working with animals. I love animals. I ended up going to the Bel-Rea Institute for Animal Health Technology. I earned an Associate’s Degree, and proceeded to work with veterinarians for the next 11 years. In 1990, I took a trip to Borneo to work with a world renowned primatologist, Birute Galdikas, studying orangutans in the jungle. While I loved the animals, I was even more fascinated by the people, and it was then that I decided I wanted to go back to school for anthropology. Initially, I thought I would do cultural anthropology, but as my education progressed, I was introduced to archaeology and I just loved it. It was like being a detective, but the “crime” happened 1000 years ago or 2000 years ago or 200 years ago. I thought to myself, “I will never get bored in this field.” So, while working one and sometimes two jobs, I went back to school eventually earning my Bachelor’s Degree in anthropology. But what kind of archaeology did I want to do? Well, I didn’t know, so I took two years off after graduating and went to work in Florida on shipwreck sites as a contract archaeologist. I was already a certified open water diver and I thought I could combine two things that I really loved. While doing that, I had a chance to analyze some animal bones from a shipwreck. The animals, you see, get trapped below decks when a ship is going down. The people usually come to the top deck and are washed overboard or jump overboard, but the animals are stuck. Well, when I analyzed these bones, I was hooked on bones! It was so fascinating to me that you could tell so much from skeletal remains. After looking into what you could with human skeletal remains, I knew what I wanted to do. I contacted my undergraduate advisor to ask him what to do, and he told me that I had to come work in Peru. There are lots of human skeletons from archaeological contexts there. He helped me to analyze some skeletons and gave me advice on where to go to school. I ended up taking his advice and going to Tulane University where I worked with John Verano, a very well-known and highly regarded paleopathologist who has and continues to work in Peru. I eventually earned both a Master’s Degree and my PhD from Tulane University. Now I am a paleopathologist/bioarchaeologist and forensic anthropologist. I have worked for many years in academia, but at the beginning of 2015, I decided to go to work as a forensic consultant. I now travel extensively working as a consultant. After these experiences, I would tell you that you should follow your dreams, and that if you want something, go after it. Don’t ever think you are too old or too poor or too whatever. If you want something and you dedicate yourself to getting it, you can achieve your goals. I hope to help you with that effort in some small way. So, welcome to class and I look forward to working with you. Show more Show less Udemy Business Teach on Udemy Get the app About us Contact us Careers Blog Help and Support Affiliate Impressum Kontakt Terms Privacy policy Cookie settings Sitemap © 2021 Udemy, Inc. window.handleCSSToggleButtonClick = function (event) { var target = event.currentTarget; var cssToggleId = target && target.dataset && target.dataset.cssToggleId; var input = cssToggleId && document.getElementById(cssToggleId); if (input) { if (input.dataset.type === 'checkbox') { input.dataset.checked = input.dataset.checked ? '' : 'checked'; } else { input.dataset.checked = input.dataset.allowToggle && input.dataset.checked ? '' : 'checked'; var radios = document.querySelectorAll('[name="' + input.dataset.name + '"]'); for (var i = 0; i (function(){window['__CF$cv$params']={r:'67886727bf4e5464',m:'f342afc7dcb9e70e199e4bfe5e275ec9529c902d-1627918809-1800-ARCGAGJHfWJarFu01+IXW3j2DfJkPRuRs7LeVeeXMOdaBH/eITe6rM3taarMItiHUgYSVRgNPWYSv33ULpaOgtQkQQuB7UKDa8uxvmTNbNllTIKhexwzeWkamTT+TP17ZByap9yied+AwAByi07/CaYPglICndeSPHq88QdofIHOfmdLUSGYUZNXSr/7MgxG4w==',s:[0x582110051a,0xbad29ddf31],}})();
  6. Estimate the age at death of the individual from skeletal elements; Estimate the height and weight of the individual at death; Calculate the minimum number of individuals in a skeletal assemblage; Estimate ancestry from skeletal remains; Identify and define traumatic lesions on human skeletal remains; Understand how to produce a professional report on the results of the analysis; Understand the ethical considerations of importance to physical anthropologists and forensic anthropologists. Show more Show less Requirements The course is taught from the perspective that the student has no prior knowledge of the field; however, students would benefit from a background in basic biology and scientific principles. Description This course will focus on the field of forensic anthropology. It will define the field as a branch of anthropology. It will then focus on the techniques used by forensic anthropologists to analyze human skeletal remains including the estimation of sex, age at death, stature, and the identification of any traumatic lesions present. It will further discuss the role of the forensic anthropologist as part of the medicolegal system. People who are interested in pursuing a career in forensic science, biology, forensic medicine, medicine, osteology, human anatomy, bioarchaeology, or archaeology can all benefit from this course. The course includes powerpoint presentations with extensive explanations of the materials contained in each, exercises to assist the student in gaining proficiency in osteological analysis, and quizzes to test your knowledge. The course includes 14 lectures, 5 exercises, and 3 quizzes to help the student build knowledge of the subject and test their competency. The course is taught from the perspective that the student has little or no prior knowledge, and no equipment is necessary. A good anatomy book will assist the student, but numerous online resources are available for students to consult. If you have an interest in learning about just how much you can really tell from that skeleton in your closet, this course is for you! Who this course is for: This course is best suited for students with a strong interest in science, human anatomy, and/or forensic science. Students who are exploring possible careers in any of the above fields would benefit from this course. Students who have an interest in a medicolegal profession would benefit from this course. Students who have an interest in a profession in law enforcement would benefit from this course. Students who are uncomfortable with viewing human remains should not take this course. None Show more Show less Course content 14 sections • 37 lectures • 38m total length Expand all sections Course outline 1 lecture • 5min Course outline Preview 04:59 The field of Anthropology 2 lectures • 1min What is Anthropology? 00:16 Introduction to Anthropology 00:04 Forensic Anthropology 2 lectures • 1min Forensic Anthropology 00:25 Forensic Anthropology 00:05 Human Osteology 2 lectures • 2min Human Osteology 00:09 Supplemental bone identification video lecture 01:56 Comparative Osteology 2 lectures • 4min Comparative Osteology 00:07 Supplemental comparative osteology video lecture 03:35 Estimation of sex from skeletal remains 2 lectures • 5min Estimating sex from skeletal elements Preview 04:50 Estimating sex from human remains powerpoint 00:05 Estimating age at death from skeletal remains 4 lectures • 6min Estimating age at death from skeletal remains 00:49 Estimate age at death powerpoint 00:04 Supplemental age estimation video lecture 03:47 Supplemental age estimation video lecture number 2 Preview 01:40 Estimating age and sex in the skeleton 5 questions Estimating stature, BMI, and MNI 2 lectures • 1min Estimating Stature, BMI, and MNI 00:39 Estimating stature, BMI, and MNI powerpoint 00:04 Estimating ancestral affiliation 3 lectures • 6min Estimating ancestry 02:01 Estimating ancestry powerpoint 00:04 Supplemental ancestry estimation video lecture 03:46 Estimating ancestry, stature, BMI, and MNI 5 questions Analyzing bones for trauma 5 lectures • 5min Analyzing trauma 00:22 How does trauma present on the skeleton; Projectile trauma 00:07 Sharp force trauma 00:04 Blunt force trauma 00:04 Supplemental trauma analysis video lecture 04:34 Trauma quiz 5 questions 4 more sections Instructor Catherine Gaither Bioarchaeologist and Forensic Anthropologist 4.5 Instructor Rating 147 Reviews 918 Students 1 Course Hi, I want to tell you a little bit about myself. My name is Catherine Gaither (you can call me Cathy), and I am an instructor with Udemy. Like many of you, my educational and professional career path was a non-traditional one. After high school, I didn’t really know what I wanted to do. I had been accepted into the Kansas City Art Institute, which at that time was a very prestigious art school, but I knew that making a living as a fine artist was difficult and I would probably have to work in commercial art. I didn’t really want to do that. So, I got a job, but soon found out that I just couldn’t ‘work for the vacations’. I needed to love my job. I thought long and hard about what I might do and decided that I would go to school for something where I could end up working with animals. I love animals. I ended up going to the Bel-Rea Institute for Animal Health Technology. I earned an Associate’s Degree, and proceeded to work with veterinarians for the next 11 years. In 1990, I took a trip to Borneo to work with a world renowned primatologist, Birute Galdikas, studying orangutans in the jungle. While I loved the animals, I was even more fascinated by the people, and it was then that I decided I wanted to go back to school for anthropology. Initially, I thought I would do cultural anthropology, but as my education progressed, I was introduced to archaeology and I just loved it. It was like being a detective, but the “crime” happened 1000 years ago or 2000 years ago or 200 years ago. I thought to myself, “I will never get bored in this field.” So, while working one and sometimes two jobs, I went back to school eventually earning my Bachelor’s Degree in anthropology. But what kind of archaeology did I want to do? Well, I didn’t know, so I took two years off after graduating and went to work in Florida on shipwreck sites as a contract archaeologist. I was already a certified open water diver and I thought I could combine two things that I really loved. While doing that, I had a chance to analyze some animal bones from a shipwreck. The animals, you see, get trapped below decks when a ship is going down. The people usually come to the top deck and are washed overboard or jump overboard, but the animals are stuck. Well, when I analyzed these bones, I was hooked on bones! It was so fascinating to me that you could tell so much from skeletal remains. After looking into what you could with human skeletal remains, I knew what I wanted to do. I contacted my undergraduate advisor to ask him what to do, and he told me that I had to come work in Peru. There are lots of human skeletons from archaeological contexts there. He helped me to analyze some skeletons and gave me advice on where to go to school. I ended up taking his advice and going to Tulane University where I worked with John Verano, a very well-known and highly regarded paleopathologist who has and continues to work in Peru. I eventually earned both a Master’s Degree and my PhD from Tulane University. Now I am a paleopathologist/bioarchaeologist and forensic anthropologist. I have worked for many years in academia, but at the beginning of 2015, I decided to go to work as a forensic consultant. I now travel extensively working as a consultant. After these experiences, I would tell you that you should follow your dreams, and that if you want something, go after it. Don’t ever think you are too old or too poor or too whatever. If you want something and you dedicate yourself to getting it, you can achieve your goals. I hope to help you with that effort in some small way. So, welcome to class and I look forward to working with you. Show more Show less Udemy Business Teach on Udemy Get the app About us Contact us Careers Blog Help and Support Affiliate Impressum Kontakt Terms Privacy policy Cookie settings Sitemap © 2021 Udemy, Inc. window.handleCSSToggleButtonClick = function (event) { var target = event.currentTarget; var cssToggleId = target && target.dataset && target.dataset.cssToggleId; var input = cssToggleId && document.getElementById(cssToggleId); if (input) { if (input.dataset.type === 'checkbox') { input.dataset.checked = input.dataset.checked ? '' : 'checked'; } else { input.dataset.checked = input.dataset.allowToggle && input.dataset.checked ? '' : 'checked'; var radios = document.querySelectorAll('[name="' + input.dataset.name + '"]'); for (var i = 0; i (function(){window['__CF$cv$params']={r:'67886727bf4e5464',m:'f342afc7dcb9e70e199e4bfe5e275ec9529c902d-1627918809-1800-ARCGAGJHfWJarFu01+IXW3j2DfJkPRuRs7LeVeeXMOdaBH/eITe6rM3taarMItiHUgYSVRgNPWYSv33ULpaOgtQkQQuB7UKDa8uxvmTNbNllTIKhexwzeWkamTT+TP17ZByap9yied+AwAByi07/CaYPglICndeSPHq88QdofIHOfmdLUSGYUZNXSr/7MgxG4w==',s:[0x582110051a,0xbad29ddf31],}})();
  7. Estimate the height and weight of the individual at death; Calculate the minimum number of individuals in a skeletal assemblage; Estimate ancestry from skeletal remains; Identify and define traumatic lesions on human skeletal remains; Understand how to produce a professional report on the results of the analysis; Understand the ethical considerations of importance to physical anthropologists and forensic anthropologists. Show more Show less Requirements The course is taught from the perspective that the student has no prior knowledge of the field; however, students would benefit from a background in basic biology and scientific principles. Description This course will focus on the field of forensic anthropology. It will define the field as a branch of anthropology. It will then focus on the techniques used by forensic anthropologists to analyze human skeletal remains including the estimation of sex, age at death, stature, and the identification of any traumatic lesions present. It will further discuss the role of the forensic anthropologist as part of the medicolegal system. People who are interested in pursuing a career in forensic science, biology, forensic medicine, medicine, osteology, human anatomy, bioarchaeology, or archaeology can all benefit from this course. The course includes powerpoint presentations with extensive explanations of the materials contained in each, exercises to assist the student in gaining proficiency in osteological analysis, and quizzes to test your knowledge. The course includes 14 lectures, 5 exercises, and 3 quizzes to help the student build knowledge of the subject and test their competency. The course is taught from the perspective that the student has little or no prior knowledge, and no equipment is necessary. A good anatomy book will assist the student, but numerous online resources are available for students to consult. If you have an interest in learning about just how much you can really tell from that skeleton in your closet, this course is for you! Who this course is for: This course is best suited for students with a strong interest in science, human anatomy, and/or forensic science. Students who are exploring possible careers in any of the above fields would benefit from this course. Students who have an interest in a medicolegal profession would benefit from this course. Students who have an interest in a profession in law enforcement would benefit from this course. Students who are uncomfortable with viewing human remains should not take this course. None Show more Show less Course content 14 sections • 37 lectures • 38m total length Expand all sections Course outline 1 lecture • 5min Course outline Preview 04:59 The field of Anthropology 2 lectures • 1min What is Anthropology? 00:16 Introduction to Anthropology 00:04 Forensic Anthropology 2 lectures • 1min Forensic Anthropology 00:25 Forensic Anthropology 00:05 Human Osteology 2 lectures • 2min Human Osteology 00:09 Supplemental bone identification video lecture 01:56 Comparative Osteology 2 lectures • 4min Comparative Osteology 00:07 Supplemental comparative osteology video lecture 03:35 Estimation of sex from skeletal remains 2 lectures • 5min Estimating sex from skeletal elements Preview 04:50 Estimating sex from human remains powerpoint 00:05 Estimating age at death from skeletal remains 4 lectures • 6min Estimating age at death from skeletal remains 00:49 Estimate age at death powerpoint 00:04 Supplemental age estimation video lecture 03:47 Supplemental age estimation video lecture number 2 Preview 01:40 Estimating age and sex in the skeleton 5 questions Estimating stature, BMI, and MNI 2 lectures • 1min Estimating Stature, BMI, and MNI 00:39 Estimating stature, BMI, and MNI powerpoint 00:04 Estimating ancestral affiliation 3 lectures • 6min Estimating ancestry 02:01 Estimating ancestry powerpoint 00:04 Supplemental ancestry estimation video lecture 03:46 Estimating ancestry, stature, BMI, and MNI 5 questions Analyzing bones for trauma 5 lectures • 5min Analyzing trauma 00:22 How does trauma present on the skeleton; Projectile trauma 00:07 Sharp force trauma 00:04 Blunt force trauma 00:04 Supplemental trauma analysis video lecture 04:34 Trauma quiz 5 questions 4 more sections Instructor Catherine Gaither Bioarchaeologist and Forensic Anthropologist 4.5 Instructor Rating 147 Reviews 918 Students 1 Course Hi, I want to tell you a little bit about myself. My name is Catherine Gaither (you can call me Cathy), and I am an instructor with Udemy. Like many of you, my educational and professional career path was a non-traditional one. After high school, I didn’t really know what I wanted to do. I had been accepted into the Kansas City Art Institute, which at that time was a very prestigious art school, but I knew that making a living as a fine artist was difficult and I would probably have to work in commercial art. I didn’t really want to do that. So, I got a job, but soon found out that I just couldn’t ‘work for the vacations’. I needed to love my job. I thought long and hard about what I might do and decided that I would go to school for something where I could end up working with animals. I love animals. I ended up going to the Bel-Rea Institute for Animal Health Technology. I earned an Associate’s Degree, and proceeded to work with veterinarians for the next 11 years. In 1990, I took a trip to Borneo to work with a world renowned primatologist, Birute Galdikas, studying orangutans in the jungle. While I loved the animals, I was even more fascinated by the people, and it was then that I decided I wanted to go back to school for anthropology. Initially, I thought I would do cultural anthropology, but as my education progressed, I was introduced to archaeology and I just loved it. It was like being a detective, but the “crime” happened 1000 years ago or 2000 years ago or 200 years ago. I thought to myself, “I will never get bored in this field.” So, while working one and sometimes two jobs, I went back to school eventually earning my Bachelor’s Degree in anthropology. But what kind of archaeology did I want to do? Well, I didn’t know, so I took two years off after graduating and went to work in Florida on shipwreck sites as a contract archaeologist. I was already a certified open water diver and I thought I could combine two things that I really loved. While doing that, I had a chance to analyze some animal bones from a shipwreck. The animals, you see, get trapped below decks when a ship is going down. The people usually come to the top deck and are washed overboard or jump overboard, but the animals are stuck. Well, when I analyzed these bones, I was hooked on bones! It was so fascinating to me that you could tell so much from skeletal remains. After looking into what you could with human skeletal remains, I knew what I wanted to do. I contacted my undergraduate advisor to ask him what to do, and he told me that I had to come work in Peru. There are lots of human skeletons from archaeological contexts there. He helped